View Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Shipping will be postponed until 8 July 2019 due to Safari Press’ annual inventory count. If you need immediate attention, please email info@safaripress.com.

Giants in the Jesse

DVD9919

$39.95

Availability: In stock

Quick Overview

Charlton-McCallum Safaris issues a DVD every two or three years so as to ensure a dense collection of good footage for each of its films; the company then works very hard on narrative, music, and pace to make the DVD as entertaining as possible.  In this DVD, PH Buzz Charlton takes us on three elephant hunts in the Zambezi Valley of Zimbabwe, but unlike most hunting in this region, the action in this film takes place during the rainy season when millions of acres of dry brush turn into a lush and biodiverse forest. 

View Full Details

Details

GIANTS IN THE JESSE
Early Season Elephant Hunting in the Zambezi Valley

Contains both DVD and Blu-ray Disc, Running time 1 hour 46 mins.

Charlton-McCallum Safaris issues a DVD every two or three years so as to ensure a dense collection of good footage for each of its films; the company then works very hard on narrative, music, and pace to make the DVD as entertaining as possible.  In this DVD, PH Buzz Charlton takes us on three elephant hunts in the Zambezi Valley of Zimbabwe, but unlike most hunting in this region, the action in this film takes place during the rainy season when millions of acres of dry brush turn into a lush and biodiverse forest. 

From November until April, the Zambezi Valley becomes a veritable Garden of Eden. It is that time of year when insects of all sorts—wasps, ants, caterpillars, spiders, flies, etc.—snakes manifest themselves and become active.  There are also nettles and brambles to contend with, so it is not hard to guess that these conditions do not necessarily improve your hunting chances. Against this stands the lush valley’s attraction for large mammals, animals that swarm to it from all directions.  

The thickness of the vegetation makes it very hard even to see elephants, let alone get close enough for a shot. One hunter spends eighteen days of a twenty-one-day trip following tracks of various elephants before he gets on the spoor of a good bull. It is day nineteen, and the hunters pick up the same track they left at dark the day before.  They again track all day, and they only just manage to catch up to the bull right at the end of the day.  Finally, luck changes for the hunter, and he gets his shot. 

After the kill, the film flashes back to the first seventeen days for the highlights of the hunt—serious rain, lost tracks, bulls mixing in with cows, and cows protective of their calves. The flashbacks illustrate how situations when hunting and tracking can suddenly turn perilous. The rainy season is also the active mating season for elephants, and many bulls are in musth; these bulls are extremely dangerous and must be approached with great caution. Some good footage of these events is caught by the cameraman.

The second hunt takes place in February, and the client has to struggle with some of the same obstacles; this time the hunter takes a nice bull with long yellow ivory. The bull is shot along the Mozambique border, and there is some interesting footage of how the meat is divided among the rural villagers. 

The final hunt also takes place in February, and again the rains hold to allow the hunters to track a bull.  This time it’s a crop-raiding bull that was called in by a community representative. After finding its twenty-inch track in a maize field, the hunt is on.  Again the very thick vegetation proves a challenge, but the climax occurs when the hunter takes his bull with a forty-yard shot. 

There is a good section on the financial effects of poaching an elephant vs. shooting one legally.  In short, it demonstrates that ninety times more revenue is generated for a local community by a legally shot animal—a staggering amount of money that poor rural areas could certainly use.  It makes a strong case of how detrimental the import restrictions from the USA and the EU are to elephant populations and the rural communities.

This is the only video we know of that shows hunting in the rainy season in the thick jesse bush of the Zambezi Valley. The footage is clear and well captured, and there are some very nice, clean shots of the tremendous wildlife found in this part of Africa during the rainy season. This is a great movie with good action that includes multiple side clips of elephant kills in addition to the main three hunts. 

Write Your Own Review

Submit your review for "Giants in the Jesse "

* Required Fields

Additional Information

DVD9919

Not Available