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African Game

Stephen Carton-Barber

$85.00

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This massive work contains very detailed maps of species and subspecies. It also is the only book we are aware of that shows the historical distribution of African animals. In many cases, it is a sad reminder of what once was, but in a few cases, optimism can be found. It is supported by hundreds of photos, almost all taken in the wild, of the animals as you might see on safari.
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AFRICAN GAME 
Species and Subspecies

by Stephen J. Carton-Barber

2017 Benoni, South Africa, 467pp, 8.5x11, color photos, maps, hardcover, dj
ISBN: 978-0-620-74669-4

The richness of Africa’s game is great and even more so when viewed at a subspecies level. What differentiates a Swayne’s hartebeest from a Tora hartebeest, or a white-eared kob from a western kob?  A western giraffe and a reticulated giraffe are very different-looking animals, but unless you see photos juxtaposed, it might be very hard to know which one is which.  The buffalo can be especially confusing as one species seems to change slightly with every two hundred miles one travels in Africa. The great number of zebras and their local variations also cause much confusion.  With some animals the differences are very subtle, such as the northern and southern white rhinos.

This massive work contains sixty-three chapters, hundreds of species and subspecies, and all African game animals. The author includes kudus, duikers, spiral-horned antelopes, elephants, buffaloes, lions, leopards, and rhinos as well as all the others one can find in the record books.  He also gives detailed descriptions for the small cats, dwarf crocs, giraffes, aardwolfs, jackals, foxes, ostriches, aardvarks, civets, badgers, and even the okapi.  For each species he provides a historical map of where they used to occur in Africa and then another map with current distributions, and both of these maps show subspecies as well.  All the maps are in full color, so it is easy to differentiate between variants, which can be confusing.  Several photos show the differences in the various subspecies, and a description is offered of each subspecies, shows where it occurs, and gives its Latin name.  In addition each species is given a detailed introduction as to who discovered it, how its name(s) came about, and other interesting facts, including common misconceptions and small factoids that will delight even the most serious hunter.

The book was a huge undertaking and the very detailed maps of species and subspecies is the most detailed we have ever seen; moreover, this is also the only book we are aware of that shows the historical distribution of African animals.  In many cases, it is a sad reminder of what once was, but in a few cases, optimism can be found.  It is supported by hundreds of photos, almost all taken in the wild, of the animals as you might see on safari.

If you are a serious African hunter and wish to know before you go, this is a must-have book.

 

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Stephen Carton-Barber

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